creamy mushroom chicken cavatappi recipe

creamy mushroom chicken cavatappi recipe

 

 

Like any person with taste, I love pasta. One of the best shapes is objectively cavatappi. Cavatappi holds onto creamy, cheesy sauces just like elbows and rotini. It perfectly combines the chewy texture of elbows with the pretty spiral of rotini. Nothing beats cavatappi. I chose to pair these cavatappi noodles with some leftover diced chicken I had, along with scallions and mushrooms. Sometimes the perfect combos are just what’s easiest.

I could eat this meal every day of the week. It also pairs nicely with garlic bread, if you’re into that. As I am still broke and living in a college town, I don’t have one of those stunning bakery’s that make fresh bread every morning. I just couldn’t bring myself to make garlic bread out of the off-brand loaf in my fridge, edges spotted with green mold. Garlic bread deserves much more than that. Or maybe it doesn’t. I guess it depends on your garlic bread standards.

A tablespoon of minced garlic in my cavatappi seemed to satisfy my garlic bread craving. Always measure garlic with your heart. You can never have enough. And if you don’t like garlic, feel free to hit that little “x” on the tab you have open.

Unfortunately, I am one of those people that can never make the right amount of pasta. It’s always either not enough or the entire box. Luckily, I only had about half a box of pasta left for this recipe. It turned out to be the perfect amount for 2 servings of this creamy mushroom chicken cavatappi.

Let’s get into the recipe:

 

 

 

Like any person with taste, I love pasta. One of the best shapes is objectively cavatappi. Cavatappi holds onto creamy, cheesy sauces just like elbows and rotini. It perfectly combines the chewy texture of elbows with the pretty spiral of rotini. Nothing beats cavatappi. I chose to pair these cavatappi noodles with some leftover diced chicken I had, along with scallions and mushrooms. Sometimes the perfect combos are just what’s easiest.

I could eat this meal every day of the week. It also pairs nicely with garlic bread, if you’re into that. As I am still broke and living in a college town, I don’t have one of those stunning bakery’s that make fresh bread every morning. I just couldn’t bring myself to make garlic bread out of the off-brand loaf in my fridge, edges spotted with green mold. Garlic bread deserves much more than that. Or maybe it doesn’t. I guess it depends on your garlic bread standards.

A tablespoon of minced garlic in my cavatappi seemed to satisfy my garlic bread craving. Always measure garlic with your heart. You can never have enough. And if you don’t like garlic, feel free to hit that little “x” on the tab you have open.

Unfortunately, I am one of those people that can never make the right amount of pasta. It’s always either not enough or the entire box. Luckily, I only had about half a box of pasta left for this recipe. It turned out to be the perfect amount for 2 servings of this creamy mushroom chicken cavatappi.

Let’s get into the recipe:

 

%

Difficulty: Super Easy

Nutrition 

  • Protien 25% 25%
  • Carbs 50% 50%
  • Fat 25% 25%

shrooms

 

Mushrooms are wonderful. Most of the time. Sometimes, they taste like slugs that have been sitting in the dirt for millions of years. I have collected a few tips over the years to make mushrooms taste a little less slimy.

Never wash your mushrooms. I know, mushrooms are possibly the dirtiest vegetable you can buy. I’m not saying to eat the dirt. Instead of rinsing or soaking them in water, take a paper towel, damp with a little bit of white vinegar and rub the dirt off. This way, your mushrooms will not absorb tons of water and get all slimy.

Another tip I can offer is to cook mushrooms uncovered, alone in the pan until all of their natural water comes out and evaporates, before adding any oil or seasoning. This way you can see when your mushrooms are dry and crispy. Adding the oil will help to deglaze the pan. If you add the oil too soon, your mushrooms will just absorb them like they do with water, again leading to soggy mushrooms.

Finally, I suggest slicing your mushrooms fairly thin. This way, after their natural water leaks out and evaporates, they will crisp up a lot easier. Once they have brown crispy edges, adding liquid to your pan will not excite their spongey behavior, but will instead create a delicious sauce will yummy mushrooms, not slugs.

 

 

shrooms

Mushrooms are wonderful. Most of the time. Sometimes, they taste like slugs that have been sitting in the dirt for millions of years. I have collected a few tips over the years to make mushrooms taste a little less slimy.

Never wash your mushrooms. I know, mushrooms are possibly the dirtiest vegetable you can buy. I’m not saying to eat the dirt. Instead of rinsing or soaking them in water, take a paper towel, damp with a little bit of white vinegar and rub the dirt off. This way, your mushrooms will not absorb tons of water and get all slimy.

Another tip I can offer is to cook mushrooms uncovered, alone in the pan until all of their natural water comes out and evaporates, before adding any oil or seasoning. This way you can see when your mushrooms are dry and crispy. Adding the oil will help to deglaze the pan. If you add the oil too soon, your mushrooms will just absorb them like they do with water, again leading to soggy mushrooms.

Finally, I suggest slicing your mushrooms fairly thin. This way, after their natural water leaks out and evaporates, they will crisp up a lot easier. Once they have brown crispy edges, adding liquid to your pan will not excite their spongey behavior, but will instead create a delicious sauce will yummy mushrooms, not slugs.

 

 

scallions > onions

 

I chose to use scallions for this recipe simply because I bought too many. But, they add a nice green color to a dish that would have been entirely brown. They also have a bit of a sharper taste than onions when cooked, so they are more noticeable in the dish. When raw however, they are milder than most normal onions. They are also thinner and will not disrupt the chewy textures.

If you don’t have a scallion collection for some unknown reason like me, feel free to use just about any other onion. I would recommend shallots just because they complement the garlic in this recipe similar to how the scallions do. They also will add a small splash of color.

Remember if you are ever missing an ingredient in one of my recipes, you can substitute it for something similar. If you don’t have anything similar, leave a comment. I can tell you what I think would work. Never let a missing ingredient, or a few missing ingredients stop you from cooking. Changes can always be made. Sometimes, an altered recipe is even better than the original. Let’s call those recipes happy accidents. Calling Bob Ross, nothing needs to be perfect to be a success.

 

 

 

scallions > onions

I chose to use scallions for this recipe simply because I bought too many. But, they add a nice green color to a dish that would have been entirely brown. They also have a bit of a sharper taste than onions when cooked, so they are more noticeable in the dish. When raw however, they are milder than most normal onions. They are also thinner and will not disrupt the chewy textures.

If you don’t have a scallion collection for some unknown reason like me, feel free to use just about any other onion. I would recommend shallots just because they complement the garlic in this recipe similar to how the scallions do. They also will add a small splash of color.

Remember if you are ever missing an ingredient in one of my recipes, you can substitute it for something similar. If you don’t have anything similar, leave a comment. I can tell you what I think would work. Never let a missing ingredient, or a few missing ingredients stop you from cooking. Changes can always be made. Sometimes, an altered recipe is even better than the original. Let’s call those recipes happy accidents. Calling Bob Ross, nothing needs to be perfect to be a success.

 

 

 

Ingredients

    • 2 scallions (chopped, whites and greens separated)
    • 8 large mushrooms, sliced
    • 2 chicken tenderloins
    • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
    • 3 cups of cavatappi, dry
    • 1 cup whole milk
    • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese
    • 1 tablespoon white truffle oil
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • 1 teaspoon black pepper

    servings

    Step by Step Instructions

    Step 1

    In a large saucepan, add a drizzle or spray of olive oil. Pat dry your chicken and season on both sides with salt and pepper. Cook the chicken breasts on medium heat for about 5 minutes on each side or until cooked through. Remove from pan and dice.

    Step 2

    Add your sliced mushrooms to the pan used to cook the chicken. Allow the mushrooms to cook down until they stop releasing liquid and are browning. Then add the scallion whites. Cook until the scallion whites are slightly transparent.

    Step 3

    Bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil. Cook the cavatappi for about 9 minutes. Reserve a half cup of pasta water before draining. 

    Step 4

    To the mushrooms and scallions, add the minced garlic and truffle oil. Cook for about 4 minutes until the garlic begins to brown. Then add the milk. Stir occasionally on medium for 5-10 minutes. Then, add the Parmesan cheese and reserved pasta water.

    Step 5

     Reduce heat to a simmer. Add the noodles and cooked chicken to the sauce. Stir until combined. Season with salt and pepper as needed. Finally, top with the green scallions and serve.

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    About The Author

    Sydney

    Hi! I’m a nutrition major at the University of Maryland specializing in sustainable packaging research. I’d love to teach about living healthier as I learn.

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